LOGLINE: After reluctantly agreeing to drive a dead body 900 miles to a funeral, two slacker friends become determined to complete their mission after a series of bizarre events and increasingly dangerous groups take an interest in their cargo.
Coverfly is a professional screenwriting dashboard that aggregates contest and coverage results into a composite metric to help the industry gauge your project's potential quality. "The Last Road Trip" is currently rated in the Top 10% of screenplays on Coverfly. | View Dashboard
2021 ScreenCraft Feature Screenplay Competition Coverage:
“These characters are believable and fleshed out well. There is enough backstory for each of the primary characters, and I didn’t feel like I just didn’t know any character well enough by the time the script was wrapped up. The secondary characters served their purpose, as well, and assisted in driving some of the more action-packed sequences in the script...  Stasia was a favorite character, of course, as her story of family abuse is explained in the script while she develops into an excellent friend to have along in times of strife with the three main male characters. She more than holds her own in each act and adds some romance without being a flimsy female character, as well. Willard also leaves plenty of room for filming some interesting sequences from his past. This script has a strong structure throughout the whole piece... Overall, I feel that the dialogue was very to the point which dictates the moods of the primary characters and the ratcheting up of the tension and action in the second and third act. The dialogue was believable and genuine for the story and for conversations between the characters that were not generally overdone or too sparse to understand. The dialogue was smart and well thought out, with interactions rarely feeling empty or stalling the plot. The exposition was dispersed effectively throughout the story, never giving one character too much to say. At the times when there would be three or more characters speaking at the same time, the writer was efficient and targeted with the lines that each character was designated to deliver, with no information being repeated or scenes becoming redundant. The characters spoke with distinct accents, tones, and dialectics relative to their environment, which was a welcomed addition to the already excellent script. Each character was readily identifiable by the manner in which they spoke, with some even having different cadences that could be picked up on.”
2020 Final Draft Big Break Semifinalist!
Top 48 for Feature Drama Screenplay | Announcement Link
2021 BlueCat Screenplay Competition Coverage:
"Your dialogue is phenomenally strong – maintaining a rhythmic and clever sensibility throughout the entire narrative. You do a wonderful job of making the relationships and dynamics between your characters feel realistic. Graham and Aaron genuinely do feel like good friends and have a great deal of chemistry – which is particularly well put on display during their initial exchange about the number of eligible women in Austin on pages 10-15. Similarly, the romantic relationship between Aaron and Stasia feels completely believable – and the scene where the characters speak in ASL at the pool does a great job of demonstrating the bond between these characters. Your action and description lines are vivid and cinematic – giving your readers a clear and vivid picture of the action transpiring onscreen. Your action sequences are visceral and tons of fun – and you do a great job of utilizing flashbacks to provide a cinematic picture of your characters’ backstories."
2021 WeScreenplay Competition Coverage:
"'The Last Road Trip' is a very compelling story that stands out with its unique setting and complex cast. The screenplay is also masterfully crafted… The characters of the story are undoubtedly one of its chief strengths because they are active and three-dimensional… The plot is bulletproof… The dialogue is another one of the most significant story mechanics. The writer has exhibited an excellent command of the English language as exposition has been kept to a minimum, while there are rarely any lines that are on the nose. In contrast, context and subtext have been employed to convey crucial information implicitly… The story has a fantastic setting that helps keep the theme of the story consistent and relevant to the moral messages embedded in the core of the premise. This gives the cast and the narrative a ton of depth, and the overall story immense value… The story is more than auspicious, and the writer has a unique voice and an authentic perspective that enhance the screenplay. This is a very entertaining and memorable read.”
Podcast Appearance:
Old Pueblo New Economy: Mentor Me Live with Aaron Eden | Guest: Jeff Brack | Finding Film Funding & Re-Invigorating Tucson's Film Industry | Podcast Link

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